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sports injury

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The elbow is a frequently underestimated and commonly misunderstood joint, leading to a considerable amount of clinical problems. A large part of this due to the largely overlapping and often unspecific symptoms of various diseases and injuries. A better understanding of elbow symptoms and the clinical exam of the elbow is the key to unlocking elbow pathology. This paper reviews a comprehensive and concise exam of the elbow that can easily be employed in a primary care sports medicine setting.
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The shoulder is the second most commonly injured joint in Sports Traumatology. A thorough clinical examination is mandatory for a strategic therapy regime. A standardized and, importantly, gentle and pain sparing, physical examination not only builts the basis for above mentioned, yet also provides a base in the doctor-patient relationship. The following guideline is meant to aid in these regards. Nonetheless, clinical experience is of utmost importance in combination with a correct physical examination. Hence, if hesitation is present about the diagnosis or treatment, there should be no hesitation in consulting an expert.
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Back pain has become one of the most frequent sports-related health problems. Up to 80% of the Swiss population experience at least one episode per year up to several times per week. It affects athletes of all age groups and all levels of activity equally. The causes of acute and chronic back pain are plentiful, but can be easily appreciated with a thorough and comprehensive history, concise clinical examination, and adequate imaging.
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Young competitive athletes are particularly at risk during puberty. Growth plates and apophyses are reduced in their stability by hormone influence. Epiphyses can slip, apophyses can tear out. Therefore, a regular examination of those athletes is important. The examination should focus on muscular asymmetries, or reduced range of motion of a joint. Shortened muscles have to be recon as a risk factor for apophysitis. Dysbalances of the musculature are mainly found in the trunk area. Training plans should be adapted to the increased vulnerability.
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Back pain is common among elite cyclists. Experiences of athletes and observations of coaches show that it may influence training quality and sometimes even limit performance during competition. Therefore the following study questions were investigated: 1) How many athletes of the Swiss cycling national teams suffer back pain during training or competition? 2) How good is athletes’ core strength? 3) What correlation exists between back pain and core strength? 4) Does an intensified core strength training reduce back pain? A total of 111 elite cyclists, 45 athletes (38 m, 7f; 19.6 ± 3.5y) of technical disciplines (BMX, Trial, Downhill, 4X) and 66 athletes (39 m, 27f; 19.5 ± 5.8y) of endurance disciplines (road, MTB, Cyclo-cross) all members of Swiss cycling national teams, took part in in the study.
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Background: Research to date clearly shows that injuries to the cruciate ligaments are a frequent occurrence in alpine ski racing. The hamstrings play an important role in protecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Here eccentric muscle activity, in particular, is of great significance as it plays a more important role in terms of duration and intensity than concentric muscle activity in alpine ski racing. The aim of this study was to establish whether the hamstrings of alpine ski racers show eccentric strength deficits following surgery on the anterior cruciate ligament.
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There’s a relatively high prevalence of groin pain in male football players across the literature (ca. 21% of all time-loss injuries per season), and it is considered the third most common injury in football. About 2/3 of all groin injuries are adductor related. Andrea Mosler (former Aspetar, Doha, now at La Trobe University, Melbourne) who presented at the #SportSuisse 2018 conference, completed her PhD with a series of prospective studies on risk factors for groin pain in athletes. The aims were to identify the intrinsic risk factors for hip/groin injury, to determine if the “at-risk” individual can be identified through screening, and to examine the association between bony hip morphology and groin injury risk.
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